Army-Royal Marine Commando/Navy

Commando Memorial

The Commando Memorial is a Category A listed monument in Scotland, dedicated to the men of the original British Commando Forces raised during World War II. Situated around a mile from Spean Bridge village, it overlooks the training areas of the Commando Training Depot established in 1942 at Achnacarry Castle. Unveiled in 1952 by the Queen Mother, it has become one of the United Kingdom's best-known monuments, both as a war memorial and as a tourist attraction offering views of Ben Nevis and Aonach Mòr.

 

During the summer at the Spean Bridge Hotel the Commando Exhibition tells the story of these men, and a Commando Trail takes in some of the locations where they trained. Several military associations still sponsor a Commando March – a timed seven-mile march, in full battle gear, backpack and combat boots, that starts at Spean Bridge and ends at Achnacarry.

 

The man who sculpted the memorial, Scott Sutherland, produced it in Dundee.

 

Sutherland was widely travelled, and had served in the British Army from 1939-45 before being appointed Head of Sculpture at Duncan of Jordanstone College Of Art, Dundee. He won the commission in 1949, and his approach to the subject may have taken those familiar with his work by surprise, as this contemporary report from The Scotsman of March 16th, 1950, suggests: “Mr. Sutherland’s design was awarded first prize of £200 in competition open to all Scottish sculptors…The design shows a definite departure from the abstract forms in which he earlier worked.”

 

 


Chatham Naval Memorial

Country:
United Kingdom
Locality:
Kent
Identified Casualties:
18617

Location Information

From the Brompton Barracks Chatham - At the traffic signals turn right onto Globe Lane - A231 (signposted 'Historic Dockyards'). Keep in left hand lane then turn left onto Dock Road (signposted Gillingham). At roundabout take the 2nd exit onto Wood Street - A231 (signposted Gillingham). Turn Right on Mansion Row (The memorial is signposted from here), then 1st left on Sally Port Gardens and finally 1st right on King's Bastion. Follow road through the housing estate, the car park to the memorial is at the end of this road. 

The Memorial overlooks the town of Chatham and is approached by a steep path from the Town Hall Gardens. 

A copy of the Memorial Register is kept in the Naval Chapel of Brompton Garrison Church and may be consulted there. The keys to the church are held at the Gate House, which is always manned. 

Copies of the Memorial Register may also be consulted at: 
Chatham Library - Tel: 01634 337799 
Medway Archives & Local Studies Centre - Tel: 01634 332714 



Visiting Information

A Visitor Information Panel has been installed to provide information about the war casualties commemorated here. This is one of many panels being erected to help raise awareness of First and Second World War casualties in the UK. 

Public access limited to the period from 08.30 to 17.00. Should for any reason the Memorial be closed during the stated hours, please telephone the Guard Room at Brompton Barracks on 01634 822442 who will arrange for the gates to be opened. Any inconvenience to visitors is greatly regretted.

Historical Information

After the First World War, an appropriate way had to be found of commemorating those members of the Royal Navy who had no known grave, the majority of deaths having occurred at sea where no permanent memorial could be provided. 

An Admiralty committee recommended that the three manning ports in Great Britain - Chatham, Plymouth and Portsmouth - should each have an identical memorial of unmistakable naval form, an obelisk, which would serve as a leading mark for shipping. The memorials were designed by Sir Robert Lorimer, who had already carried out a considerable amount of work for the Commission, with sculpture by Henry Poole. The Chatham Naval Memorial was unveiled by the Prince of Wales (the future King Edward VIII) on 26 April 1924. 

After the Second World War it was decided that the naval memorials should be extended to provide space for commemorating the naval dead without graves of that war, but since the three sites were dissimilar, a different architectural treatment was required for each. The architect for the Second World War extension at Chatham was Sir Edward Maufe (who also designed the Air Forces memorial at Runnymede) and the additional sculpture was by Charles Wheeler and William McMillan. The Extension was unveiled by the Duke of Edinburgh on 15 October 1952. 

Chatham Naval Memorial commemorates 8,517 sailors of the First World War and 10,098 of the Second World War.

Plymouth Naval Memorial

United Kingdom
Locality:
Devon
Identified Casualties:
23199

Location Information

The Memorial is situated centrally on The Hoe which looks directly towards Plymouth Sound. It is accessible at all times. Copies of the Memorial Register are kept at the Tourist Information Office at Island House, 9 The Barbican, Plymouth, PL1 2LS, and also in the Naval Historical Section at Plymouth Library. 

http://www.webrarian.co.uk/rnwm/ 

Visiting Information

Visitors are kindly requested not to 'embellish' inscriptions on the memorial using chalk or abrasive products in order to enhance them for photographic purposes. Previous incidences of this have damaged the panels. 


Historical Information

After the First World War, an appropriate way had to be found of commemorating those members of the Royal Navy who had no known grave, the majority of deaths having occurred at sea where no permanent memorial could be provided. 

An Admiralty committee recommended that the three manning ports in Great Britain - Chatham, Plymouth and Portsmouth - should each have an identical memorial of unmistakable naval form, an obelisk, which would serve as a leading mark for shipping. The memorials were designed by Sir Robert Lorimer, who had already carried out a considerable amount of work for the Commission, with sculpture by Henry Poole. The Plymouth Naval Memorial was unveiled by HRH Prince George on 29 July 1924. 

After the Second World War it was decided that the naval memorials should be extended to provide space for commemorating the naval dead without graves of that war, but since the three sites were dissimilar, a different architectural treatment was required for each. The architect for the Second World War extension at Plymouth was Sir Edward Maufe (who also designed the Air Forces memorial at Runnymede) and the additional sculpture was by Charles Wheeler and William McMillan. The Extension was unveiled by HRH Princess Margaret on 20 May 1954. A further unveiling took place on 11 November 1956, when panels honouring those who died on shore, but who had no known grave, were unveiled by Admiral Sir Mark Pizey. 

In addition to commemorating seamen of the Royal Navy who sailed from Plymouth, the First World War panels also bears the names of sailors from Australia and South Africa. The governments of the other Commonwealth nations chose to commemorate their dead elsewhere, for the most part on memorials in their home ports. After the Second World War, Canada and New Zealand again chose commemoration at home, but the memorial at Plymouth commemorates sailors from all other parts of the Commonwealth. 

Plymouth Naval Memorial commemorates 7,251 sailors of the First World War and 15,933 of the Second World War.

Portsmouth Naval Memorial

United Kingdom
Locality:
Hampshire
Identified Casualties:
24590

Location Information

The Memorial is situated on Southsea Common overlooking the promenade, and is accessible at all times. A copy of the Memorial Register is kept at the Civic Offices in Guildhall Square and may be consulted there. 

http://www.memorialsinportsmouth.co.uk/southsea/naval.htm 



Visiting Information

Visitor Information Panels have recently been installed at the Portsmouth Naval Memorial to provide information about the war casualties commemorated here. Panels are being erected to help raise awareness of First and Second World War casualties in the UK (Feb 2013) ** Disabled access to the World War 2 Section of the Memorial is possible via the Common and the ramps at the rear of the Memorial. For further information regarding disabled access, please contact our Enquiries Section on 01628 507200.

Historical Information

After the First World War, an appropriate way had to be found of commemorating those members of the Royal Navy who had no known grave, the majority of deaths having occurred at sea where no permanent memorial could be provided. 

An Admiralty committee recommended that the three manning ports in Great Britain - Chatham, Plymouth and Portsmouth - should each have an identical memorial of unmistakable naval form, an obelisk, which would serve as a leading mark for shipping. The memorials were designed by Sir Robert Lorimer, who had already carried out a considerable amount of work for the Commission, with sculpture by Henry Poole. The Portsmouth Naval Memorial was unveiled by the Duke of York (the future George VI) on 15 October 1924. 

After the Second World War it was decided that the naval memorials should be extended to provide space for commemorating the naval dead without graves of that war, but since the three sites were dissimilar, a different architectural treatment was required for each. The architect for the Second World War extension at Portsmouth was Sir Edward Maufe (who also designed the Air Forces memorial at Runnymede) and the additional sculpture was by Charles Wheeler, William McMillan, and Esmond Burton. The Extension was unveiled by the Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother on 29 April 1953. 

Portsmouth Naval Memorial commemorates around 10,000 sailors of the First World War and almost 15,000 of the Second World War.